I'm on a dream march. Drummers need not apply.

25th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from BASED JANE with 7,400 notes

gradientlair:

Black women who made the Time 100 List For 2014. Creative singer, dancer, artist, philanthropist and feminist Beyoncé, creative outspoken actor, artist and feminist Kerry Washington, tennis legend, philanthropist and business owner Serena WilliamsChicagoan and now head of U.N. World Food Programme Ertharin CousinNigerian economist and past Finance Minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Ugandan activist Sister Rosemary Nyirumbe, South African human rights lawyer Thuli Madonsela, and Kenyan tech guru Ory Okolloh. 

Laverne Cox and Janet Mock DIDN’T make the list though. Clearly both had a major impact in 2013. Both have been outspoken about Black trans women and trans women of colour’s rights and lives, both have created remarkable and important art and both have been influential and highly visible. They should’ve been there. Easily.

Beyoncé made the Time 100 List in 2013 as well, but this year has the cover after a successful and influential year in 2013, from her Super Bowl performance, to her world tour, to her incredible visual album BEYONCÉ, to being more outspoken with her feminist politics through her music, and through other projects—some I like (speaking, writing, fundraising, philanthropy), some I’ve critiqued (i.e. #BanBossy/Lean In)—all while being committed to her family, her marriage to Jay-Z and motherhood to Blue Ivy

Several Black men made the list as well, including two of my personal faves, Oscar winning film director Steve McQueen and Super Bowl champion Richard Sherman

As I wrote about yesterday, there is a DIFFERENCE between the legitimate desire for representation of Black women’s humanity in the media while still creating our own media (as ignoring the mainstream does not erase harmful messages about us are placed there) and "oh that’s White approval!" This distinction and understanding of how media representation impacts us is important.

Complete Time 100 List For 2014 

Source: gradientlair.com

23rd April 2014

Photoset reblogged from BASED JANE with 1,777 notes

thechanelmuse:

Divided Family: Through Music, Cubans Trace Their Roots To Sierra Leone

It is often said that music has the power to bring people together. That sentiment is definitely an understatement when it comes to the Afro-Cubans community Ganga-Longoba of Perico. 

Cuba’s Ganga people have been singing the same African chants for generations, but it wasn’t until an Australian researcher took interest in the songs, that they were able to trace their chants to a remote village in Sierra Leone, 170 years after the slave trade.

“When I first filmed the Ganga-Longoba, I believed their ceremonies were a mixture of many different ethnic groups,” says historian Emma Christopher, of Sydney University. “I had no idea that a large number of Ganga songs would come from just one village. I think that’s extremely unusual,” she says.

After tracing their roots back to Sierra Leone, four Cubans made the trip to the African country to delve more into their history. Christopher captured the moment for the documentary They Are We.

"Cuba was cut off at a time when other nations in the Americas were going through black pride and fighting for some justice for what happened to their ancestors," says Dr. Christopher, who points out that the island’s 1959 revolution declared racism ‘solved’. That left a lot of Afro-Cubans adrift, not knowing how to celebrate where they came from and be proud of it," she says.

Whilst many Cubans of Spanish descent have rushed to seek out their ancestry—and passports—Afro-Cubans have been far less anxious to do the same. Organizing a reunion for the divided “family” wasn’t easy given restrictions on traveling from Cuba at the time, and limited resources. But eventually, four Cubans did make their ancestors’ voyage in reverse - to Sierra Leone.

“When I opened my mouth to sing, they just stood there staring,” Elvira Fumero recalls of her arrival in Mokpangumba. “Then it was like an explosion. They started to sing the responses, and dance with me. And I knew then that this was where the Ganga came from,” she says, smiling.

For Alfredo Duquesne, visiting Sierra Leone changed everything.

"It was as if I’d just left the previous weekend. I touched the soil and thought: ‘This is it. I’ve come back,’" he says, describing himself now as ‘at peace’. "At last I know where I come from," Alfredo says. "I’m not a stranger anymore."

Source

Source: thechanelmuse

23rd April 2014

Photo reblogged from NPR with 367 notes

cartermagazine:

Today In History
‘Granville T. Woods, inventor of over 50 products, was born in Columbus, OH, on this date April 23, 1856. The steam-boiler furnace, the telegraph system for trains, and automatic air brakes were some of his inventions.’
(picture: Granville T. Woods)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History

‘Granville T. Woods, inventor of over 50 products, was born in Columbus, OH, on this date April 23, 1856. The steam-boiler furnace, the telegraph system for trains, and automatic air brakes were some of his inventions.’

(picture: Granville T. Woods)

- CARTER Magazine

Source: cartermagazine

22nd April 2014

Photoset reblogged from BASED JANE with 69,250 notes

basedjane:

"Brown eyed people are responsible for the fact that you have electricity. Many of the components for generating and transmitting electricity were invented by brown eyed people.

Brown eyed people gave us our alphabet. Brown eyed people gave us our numeration system. Brown eyed people gave us the paper on which we write these anonymous letters to me that tell me that brown eyed people are inferior.

Brown eyed people are the originators, the ones who founded every major religion on Earth. No white people have ever founded a major religion.

Now you need to realize the contributions that have been made to society, to civilization by brown eyed people, by PEOPLE OF COLOR.

I’m talking about people of color here folks. And most of us are not aware of those things because we live in a racist society.

And because we are educated by a racist school system that only teaches us about white contributions.”

- Jane Elliot on the Oprah Winfrey Show panel on racism in 1992

Source: exgynocraticgrrl

9th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Emergent Futures Tumblelog with 22,126 notes

Jon Stewart and Matt Taibbi discuss the different treatment afforded to ‘street’ based drug users and white-collar criminals profiting from the drug trade.

Source: sandandglass

9th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from with 45,596 notes

specialbored:

DINNER IS COMING. (Part 2)

Source: specialbored

7th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from with 2,641 notes

doctafoo:

 Afua Richardson Illustrates the Negro Speaks of Rivers by Langston Hughes for NPR

Source: doctafoo

7th April 2014

Photo reblogged from BASED JANE with 1,118,149 notes

Source: gifak-net

28th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from *@dopefreshlife* with 12,523 notes

Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet

↳ C → cuban-american
"I was on a plane watching a documentary about Diana Vreeland, who was the editor of Vogue for years, who is incredible […] They asked her ‘How do you get to be Diana Vreeland?’ and her response was ‘Well, darling, first you have to arrange to be born in Paris!’ And that worked for her, and that’s great, but if someone were to ask me, I’d say: First, you’d have to arrange to be born in the Bronx, to two brilliant, fantastic, Cuban immigrants who taught me grace under fire…sometimes quite literally, ‘cause it was the Bronx…who taught me that work was a blessing and not a chore, who taught me that you determine your self worth and that you tell people who you are…they don’t get to tell you." - Gina Torres

Source: bitchcraftandwiggatry

28th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from BASED JANE with 531,093 notes

Source: opencult